Light Stencils Commemorate Victims of the 2011 Christchurch Earthquake | Colossal

 

 

The 2011 Christchurch earthquake was the largest natural disaster in New Zealand’s history, claiming the lives of 181 people and leaving behind nearly $30 billion in rebuilding costs. Touched by the events of that February day, photographer Fabrice Wittner set out to confront the destruction the best way he knew how: by making art. His Enlightened Souls project utilizes large, human-sized stencils that are painted with light during long exposures, creating thin portraits that appear almost like holograms. Many more images and process shots can be seen here. Images courtesy the artist. (via behance)

Light Stencils Commemorate Victims of the 2011 Christchurch Earthquake | Colossal.

wind paintings

 

 

 

 

 

If there’s a single thing that keeps me working in design, it’s that moment when you look at something for the first time and it simply takes your breath away. That’s exactly what happened when I saw these beautiful Wind Paintings from artist Bob Verschueren. Verschueren worked in the 1970s and 80s using wind to create these stunning landscape pieces. Each work would focus on a material like iron oxide, yellow ochre or burnt umber, which was then laid out in linear patterns on the land. Verschueren would let the wind move and blow the pigments around and create an altered version of the shape that represented the stunning collaboration between man and nature. Though these pieces were created years ago, Tom at I Love Belgium is celebrating them on his fantastic blog and was kind enough to send them my way. Click here to check out more of Verschueren’s work online; it’s the sort of artwork that makes me want to throw this laptop aside and run outside. xo, grace

wind paintings | Design*Sponge.

1,000 Doors by Choi Jeong-Hwa

 

 

 

 

 

 

Doors was an enormous 10-story public art installation made from 1,000 reused doors by South Korean artist Choi Jeong-Hwa. From what I can tell it appears the piece was installed somewhere in Seoul in 2009. Choi discusses his process over on the Creators Project where he talks about becoming a public installation artist because he was unable to draw or paint, but would instead spend much of his time walking around the city discovering interesting trash and discarded objects and photographing it. (via ju est fou)

via 1,000 Doors by Choi Jeong-Hwa | Colossal.

Thomas Forsyth: Chess?

Chess?
This is my mischievous challenge on the rigidly structured squares of the chessboard. I have introduced new components to the board, some of which may only emerge during play. This encourages players to communicate and have creative input rather than simply follow pre-determined rules. You can play spontaneously, or those who want a more strategic game can negotiate rules before the game commences. This all means that players don’t need to know how to play chess in order to participate.

Photography by Jonathan Green.

In Vino Veritas, Rainbow Edition @ the Barbican Centre

 

“At first glance, the Curve Gallery at the Barbican looks as if it has been transformed into a glorified gallery gift shop. Step inside, however, and you will notice that the objects adorning the sleek lacquered tabletop units possess an element of the surreal and idiosyncratic, including hacksaw shaped bread boards and tiny wind up music boxes.
This is the Design Den – the Barbican’s answer to a pop-up shop, keeping intact a design aesthetic befitting of its Brutalist location. Focusing on the applied arts, and in conjunction with DesignMarketo — ‘a platform that diffuses up-and-coming designers’ small or limited productions’ – the consumer cultural experience comes alive. (…)
Hato Press, a specialty printing and publishing house based near London Fields, showcase small notebooks of illustrations collated from test prints and mistakes in their studio. Their expertise in screen and Risograph print processes create beautifully constructed art books. Elsewhere, design fuses with humour, from the Ty DIY Edition Shower Curtain with marker pen (create your perfect shower curtain) to Amandine Alessandra’s In Rainbow Veritas, a plain white bistro tablecloth that reveals a flower blossom pattern when wine, curry sauce or tea is spilt on it. (…)”

Rosie Higham-Stainton, http://hackneycitizen.co.uk/

Design Den
The Curve
Barbican Centre, Silk Street
London, EC2Y 8DS
Until 23 December 2011
Mon – Sat 10am – 8pm
Sun 12 noon – 8pm

Geoffroy Tory

 

 

Véritable icône bibliophilique, artisan du livre moderne, promoteur de la culture graphique, Geoffroy Tory reste et demeure un inclassable. Imprimeur officiel de François Ier, illustrateur attitré de Du Bellay, créateur de la cédille, de l’apostrophe et des lettres accentuées, ce maître de la mise en page est un père spirituel pour un grand nombre d’éditeurs, de typographes et de relieurs contemporains. Aussi n’est-ce pas un hasard si le Musée national de la Renaissance et la Bibliothèque nationale de France lui rendent aujourd’hui hommage.

Via http://www.plume-mag.com/extrait/322/110330/geoffroy-tory-ou-la-revolution-typographique

Aleksandra Domanović: 19:30 Stacks

 

 

 

 

 

 

19:30 Stacks is a new series of sculptures by Aleksandra Domanović. They’re actually stacks of A4 and A3 paper with parts of photos printed on their side. To create this effect, Aleksandra made huge PDF files which she printed with an inkjet printer set to “border-less printing”. You can actually print one yourself: download this 5555 A4 pages PDF, print it out, place 1500 empty pages on top and 1500 at the bottom of the printed stack. Voila, you have one of the stacks.

 

19:30 Stacks – today and tomorrow.

Sofia Design Week: When life gives you bulgur, make lemonade

bulgur_lemonade

During the Sofia Design Week, DesignMarketo will present Lemonade For All, a new collection of specially commissioned products made by a selection of international designers. The new collection will be presented in their pop up shop/workshop, where they will be handing out freshly home-made lemonade to visitors.

For this occasion, I’m giving a cooking workshop entitles When life gives you bulgur, make lemonade, a twisted interpretation of the popular saying about doing the best of what you have. This is happening on Wednesday 15 June, 2-5pm, so please do pop in if you are in Sofia!

The workshops are free and opened to all. They are limited to about 10-15 people and booking by email is essential. Bookings are based on a first booked/first served basis. To register: info@designmarketo.com

INFORMATION
DesignMarketo
5 Open Art Space
1? Hristo Botev Blvd.
1606 Sofia, Bulgaria
(Next to “Pette Kiusheta”)
Open everyday 10am to 7pm.

More info, design, worskhops and lemonade here: http://designmarketo.com/events/sofia-design-week-2011/

Show: Museum für Druckkunst Leipzig

Leipzg

TYPOTAGE invites Michael von Aichberger, Amandine Alessandra, Bela Borsodi, Alexander Branczyk, Andrew Byrom, Arnold Dreyblatt, Götz Gramlich, Sascha Grewe, MAGMA Brand Design, Ebon Heath, Susan Hefuna, Monika Heineck, Aoyama Hina, Domingo Kdekilo, René Knip, Vladimir Koncar, Eric Ku, Pantea Lachin, Sebastian Lemm, Thomas Mayfried, Niessen & de Vries, Julius Popp, Lisa Rienermann, Camilo Rojas, Stefan Sagmeister, Lee Stokes, Reona Ueda, Ralph Ueltzhöffer, usus,Bembo’s Zoo, zwölf to exhibit their typographic work at the Museum of the Printing Arts of Leipzig, Germany.

Workshops and Museum of the Printing Arts Leipzig
May, 8th – July, 17th 2011

http://www.druckkunst-museum.de/home.html

Clerkenwell Design Week 2011: Stop Motion Typography workshop

amandine_alessandraTypographic performance at Liverpool Street Station (18:00:00 – 19:00:00)

For Clerkenwell Design Week 2011 DesignMarketo is setting up at the Farmiloe Building on St John Street in collaboration with the Barbican Art Centre. I will be giving a (free) workshop based on stop motion and typography, using the iconic building space as a grid to produce a human typeface.
Wednesday 25.05.11 from 2-4pm

Also: do not miss Alexandre Bettler‘s workshop on mobile typography:
Thursday 26.05.11 from 5-pm

24-26 May 2011
34, St John Street, London
EC1M 4AY

http://designmarketo.com/events/clerkenwell-design-week-2011/

New collection: In Rainbow Veritas

Amandine_Alessandra

Cutlery Use Dev Org, tablecloth Amandine Alessandra during A Dinner with DesignMarketo at the Barbican Gallery.

Amandine_Alessandra

Amandine_Alessandra

In Rainbow Veritas is a new edition of In vino Veritas, a plain white bistrot tablecloth that reveals its pattern as wine, blueberry juice, curry sauce or tea is spilled on it, diverting the attention away from an awkward situation, as an irregular pattern of flowers blossoms in the stain.
The new collection was recently launched in London at the dinner hosted by DesignMarketo
at the Barbican Gallery.

A limited series, hand printed in East London by All Cats Are Grey and sold on DesignMarketo.

LOVE on DesignMarketo

LOVE, for Japan—by Akinori Oishi

Like anyone this past week, we’ve been following the aftermath of the terrible events in Japan. We decided to produce a series of posters to support and encourage your donations. For the first poster we asked our friends Akinori Oishi to draw and All Cats Are Grey to print.

Silkscreen print, 2 colours, on Somerset “rough edges” 220g approx. 50×70cm—edition of 50.

More links:

Akinori Oishi
aki-air.com/

printed by:
All Cats Are Grey
www.allcatsaregreyprints.com/

Get it there: LOVE on DesignMarketo.

Typography Summer School


Typography Summer School 2011

A week-long programme of typographic study in London for recent graduates and professionals. Alongside live projects run by Fraser Muggeridge, the school will host talks, seminars and tutorials from daily visiting practitioners: APFEL (A Practice for Everyday Life), Sara De Bondt, Europa, Ken Garland, James Langdon, David Pearson.

Applications are now open (until 1st May 2011)
20 places are available for each week: 4–8 July 2011 & 11–15 July 2011

manystuff.org — Graphic Design daily selection » Blog Archive » Typography Summer School 2011.

Xavier Antin / Just in Time, or A Short History of Production

A book printed through a printing chain made of four desktop printers using four different colors and technologies dated from 1880 to 1976. A production process that brings together small scale and large scale production, two sides of the same history.

  • MAGENTA (Stencil duplicator, 1880)
  • CYAN (Spirit duplicator, 1923)
  • BLACK (Laser printer, 1969)
  • YELLOW (Inkjet printer, 1976)

xavier antin / Just in Time, or A Short History of Production.

  • 210 x 297 mm
  • 42 pages
  • 100 copies
  • english

even*cleveland: on a grand scale

In March of 2010, Jim Denevan and his crew created a large scale artwork on the frozen surface of Lake Baikal, Siberia. The spiral of circles, along a fibonacci curve, grow from an origin of 18″ to several miles in diameter.

'You've got to support whatever grand scheme, whether it's yours or someone else's. You never know why until you're actually in it and doing it.' – Caleb Coe

From The Anthropologist, via all the mountains. Amazing.

via even*cleveland: on a grand scale.

Simple stuff to be happy about (Spontaneous City – London Fieldworks)

SPONTANEOUS CITY IN THE TREE OF HEAVEN
Duncan Terrace Gardens
Islington, London, N1
19 July, 2010 ongoing

Cremorne Gardens
Chelsea, London, SW10
19 July, 2010 ongoing

London Fieldworks’ Spontaneous City in the Tree of Heaven is a sculptural installation drawing on the ecology and biodiversity of two sites on opposite sides of London: Duncan Terrace Gardens in the East and Cremorne Gardens in the West. The installations are constructed from several hundred bespoke bird boxes mounted in two trees of heaven (Ailanthus altissima) and reflect the forms of the surrounding architecture; a combination of Georgian town houses, and 60’s social housing around Duncan Terrace Gardens, and the World’s End Estate adjacent to Cremorne Gardens. Spontaneous City in the Tree of Heaven has developed out of a recent London Fieldworks project, Super Kingdom, commissioned by Stour Valley Arts for Kings Wood in Kent, where ‘show homes’ for animals were constructed based on the architecture of despot’s palaces.

“As an added layer of biodiversity speak, there’s irony in the title of the “Spontaneous City in the Tree of Heaven” project. The “tree of heaven” or Ailanthus altissima, a deciduous tree native to both northeast and central China and Taiwan, is actually a tree species of much botanical interest in London, and elsewhere in England generally. Essentially, a lot of people are quite concerned that this ornamental turn invasive species is poised to rocket in numbers. It’s one of the fastest growing trees around, it’s allelopathic (meaning it produces a chemical that inhibits the growth or other plants), and its seed production capabilities are almost unmatched”. David Ng

The installations have been commissioned for the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea and Islington Council by up projects as part of their Secret Garden Project ; a new programme of artists commissions and events for secret gardens, lesser known green spaces, and urban corners across London. They will be in situ for three years.

Simple stuff to be happy about (Spontaneous City – London Fieldworks).

Giant penis crop-circle mysteriously erected at Eiffel Tower in Paris

Holy dueling Gallic phallic symbols, Batman! French journalist Aude Baron tells Boing Boing,

On Friday, if you were going to the Eiffel Tower, in Paris, you could see a giant penis! It was drawn into the snow covering the grass. A Dutch tourist took a picture and posted it on Twitter. Amazing view! But what if it was a PhotoShop? To be sure, I called the store which is a the first floor of the Tour Eiffel, and I was confirmed the masterpiece was still here, making everyone laugh. Unfortunately the garden department of Paris city hall told me they would soon rake it up.

Giant penis crop-circle mysteriously erected at Eiffel Tower in Paris – Boing Boing.

Full story here in Lepost.fr. The original picture is here

Graham, Dan: Time Delay Room

Dan Graham
«Time Delay Room»

This closed-circuit installation was varied by Dan Graham six times following the same structural set-up as described below:
«Two rooms of equal size, connected by an opening at one side, under surveillance by two video cameras positioned at the connecting point between the two rooms. The front inside wall of each features two video screens – within the scope of the surveillance cameras. The monitor which the visitor coming out of the other room spies first shows the live behavior of the people in the respective other room. In both rooms, the second screen shows an image of the behavior of the viewers in the respectively other room – but with an eight second delay.
The time-lag of eight seconds is the outer limit of the neurophysiological short-term memory that forms an immediate part of our present perception and affects this «from within». If you see your behavior eight seconds ago presented on a video monitor «from outside» you will probably therefore not recognize the distance in time but tend to identify your current perception and current behavior with the state eight seconds earlier. Since this leads to inconsistent impressions which you then respond to, you get caught up in a feedback loop. You feel trapped in a state of observation, in which your self-observation is subject to some outside visible control. In this manner, you as the viewer experience yourself as part of a social group of observed observers [instead of, as in the traditional view of art, standing arrested in individual contemplation before an auratic object].

(Gregor Stemmrich, «Dan Graham,» in Thomas Y. Levin, Ursula Frohne, Peter Weibel (eds.), CTRL[SPACE]. Rhetorics of Surveillance from Bentham to Big Brother, ZKM | Center for Art and Media, Karlsruhe, 2001, The MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, London, 2002, p. 68.)

Media Art Net | Graham, Dan: Time Delay Room.